Our leaders must take control of crime

After a violent attack on New York City itself, it’s comforting to spin stories about how tough and resilient we are – that New Yorkers will return to the subways as if nothing had happened. This “tough New York” story has been true in the recent past, from Sept. 11 to the West Side bike path attack that killed eight people in 2017. But we can not trust it now. New Yorkers are not going to be there for a city that stumbles them.

During the collapse caused by the Corona virus in New York, this is its third year, smart voices have told us that we should not worry about the future of the city because the city is always coming back. People did not say no one will return to office towers after 9/11?

Well, no, they are really Did not say it that people Made Return to their offices in Manhattan, immediately. We had no choice. Similarly, although we were nervous about the entry of the subway that could turn into mass terror scenes, we had no choice in the matter either.

This is not a revisionist history. In 2001, the number of subway passengers increased by almost 2% compared to 2000 levels, and in 2002 it increased again, by half a percent. Similarly, after the 2017 truck terror attack on the Hudson River bike path and the Times Square bombing that killed one that year, New York immediately returned.

This time it’s different. The era of terror that began on September 11 was also the era of violent crime in New York at its peak. Yes, people have occasionally thought about the subway bomb or if they are on a low enough floor in an office building to jump out the window.

People who fled the subway platform in Sunset Park, Brooklyn during the April 12, 2022 mass shooting.
People who fled the subway platform in Sunset Park, Brooklyn during the April 12, 2022 mass shooting.
Will B Wild through AP

But those were background fears – and with homicides falling almost every year, from 649 in 2001 to below 300 in 2017 and 2018, people did not worry about being pushed to their deaths down the subway stairs or having their children killed by “stray” walking bullets Home from school.

For that matter, people who rode the subway in the 1970s and 1980s had to worry about robbery and random stabbings, but they did not have to worry about mass ideological terrorism.

Now the burden of anxiety is double what it was in 2019 and even in the 80s. New Yorkers on a subway or platform must make sure a randomly ill person is pushed or stabbed. They must worry that a youth gang may rob them. And they must make sure someone else has spent his entire epidemic dealing with his complaints and planning a spectacular terrorist attack.

The city also does not unite, as it once did, after such attacks. In the month after Sept. 11, New York City homicides dropped 11 percent. In contrast, just hours after the Brooklyn subway shooting suspect injured 29 people, “regular” criminals shot and killed three people in the Bronx (in three separate incidents) and injured 13 in the Bronx and Brooklyn.

The violent “ordinary” subway crime also returned immediately. About 17 hours after the massacre in Brooklyn, a suspect stabbed two men on the Harlem platform.

Violent subway crime increased by 40% in the first two months of the year compared to 2019, despite the number of passengers rarely exceeding 60% of the pre-COVID standard.

Police are investigating the scene of the shooting in the Bronx on April 12, 2022.
Police are investigating the scene of the shooting in the Bronx on April 12, 2022.
William C. Lopez / NYPost

New Yorkers who have been away from subways for 25 months are barely planning to flock back now. God only Hope is a visible and respectful police presence that makes New Yorkers feel more secure – and that leads to immediate double-digit declines in daily underground crime.

Following the Brooklyn bombing, Mayor Eric Adams said he would double the number of officers deployed on the subway. Done right, more cops who engage in more interactions with lawbreakers and people who behave suspiciously or unsteadily will relate both Problems: The daily reality of robbery and underground attacks and the low but real risk of targeted terrorist attacks.

And hmmm, what is it? After the attack, our left-wing city inspector, Brad Lander, gave “Thank you to a grateful city” to “NYPD officers.” He even said he was glad the suspect was arrested!

NYPD cops patrol 36th Street in Brooklyn, where the shooting took place on April 13, 2022.
NYPD cops patrol 36th Street in Brooklyn, where the shooting took place on April 13, 2022.
Gregory P. mango

Let’s hope the state legislators have a similar revelation: People who engage in violence belong behind bars.

The shooter apparently aimed for the subways apparently because he understands how important they are to New York City. With more than two million riders before the COVID still avoiding the track every day, New York City elected officials should appreciate that fact as well.

Nicole Jelinas is a contributing editor to the City Journal of the Manhattan Institute.

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